Those of you who have recently graduated can even apply to temporary one-year contracts. Passionate and aspiring EDUopinions authors and guest-writers, collecting, writing and sharing information about higher education! Get free advice on where to study Business and Management in Europe. The final and most important one is to get your health and malpractice insurances, this will save you a whole load of unnecessary hassle. There are also business opportunities in the oil and gas sectors. They are experiencing a shortage in the IT sector and are eagerly seeking professionals to aid in this area. This gives them a job unemployed rate at only, However, this does not mean they aren’t willing to take foreigners on. Working hours tend to be shorter than most countries, and the gender split of the workforce is fairly equal – most men and women are in full-time employment. It sits at number 2 with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the whole of Europe, at. Many expats flock to this South-East Asian… One or more fields have an error. Get free advice on where to study Business and Management in Europe. Any information published by Condé Nast Traveler is not intended as a substitute for medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional. Surprisingly, this Balkan country is one of the most underrated countries in Europe, whether for living or tourism. All employees at Danish companies have a say in company decisions, which are discussed in open forum meetings. It’s an extremely tolerant and liberal country where pretty much anything goes, making it an easy place to adjust to. Known for its friendly environment and eccentric culture. Most roles need you to be fluent in English and some Dutch, so you might want to brush up on the lingo before you start job hunting. . Time to book those flights! Denmark balances salary against cost of living well, and average daily work hours (6.6 per day) way outnumber leisure hours (8.8 per day). It’s not all countryside, though. Cambodia is one of the easiest countries to obtain a long-term working visa. This, therefore, assures individuals from the country have the same freedom of movement rules as all the other EU member states. Despite all this, we couldn’t score this lovely scenic country higher than the 5th slot and this is because of its rigorous and fierce competition. Spain has a large automotive industry and houses some of the major global pharmaceutical giants (GSK, Pfizer) and clothing companies (Inditex, Mango). Around 19% of the country’s population is made up of expats, most of them living in Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Utrecht. Working in Denmark can be a shock. Another great reason to move is that everyone has equal rights in the Netherlands, meaning that there’s no place for discrimination when reviewing applications, salaries or promotions of employees. So do consider taking up Spanish, this is what could put you at the forefront of the race. due to its strong economy, whilst also being rated the best for a good work-life balance. Each benefit is in itself so vast and extensive, but which country could best provide this for you? [The 4 Best Universities for Business Studies in Berlin], [5 Reasons Why to Study your MBA in Germany]. It is no wonder so many people opt for this, with its low cost of living, one could say you would even get more for your money. Opening an account with Currency Solutions is completely free and you’ll be able to make currency transfers anytime at our excellent exchange rates. If you have vocational qualifications, plus some understanding of the German language, great news the chances of gaining employment are high for you. *The information in this article is correct at the time of publishing (February 2020). Maybe you should a) get in line, and b) move to Belgium. Norway has been named the most prosperous country to live in due to its strong economy, whilst also being rated the best for a good work-life balance. Offering roughly an average wage of around 45,000 Euros in a week of working to a maximum of 40 hours. The new start-up culture is giving young and excited entrepreneurs an opportunity to not only showcase their talents but also thrive, thanks to the backing of the government and its funding. The Netherlands is one of Europe’s most popular countries to live and work. All of which makes it a strong option for working expats. Many offices in Austria have an 8–5 workday—except for Fridays, when employees are encouraged to go home at 3 p.m. Neverending "summer Fridays" aside, the country is also one of the best in the world for folks looking to relocate; according to a recent study, 80 percent of expats in Austria said their work-life balance improved since moving there (compared to the 53 percent global average). It has even topped the, It is a country that offers great intercultural experience, short working weeks and an, Norway’s thriving industries include petroleum and gas (Statoil), fishing, finance (Nordea) and chemicals (Norsk Hydro). Denmark is often called the happiest country in the world – and with good reason. Contact will be by WhatsApp and email. With salaries almost double (even triple in some cases) than that of most European countries, an average salary could go up to a staggering 105 000 EUR per 45 hours a week. There’s a balance between work and family life, high education standards, and a thriving business climate. ("You will have fun!") top 5 countries in Europe to study and work, Germany has remained consistently at the top of many lists for the past three years, and rightly so. Of course, your employability will be much better if you first study in the country you want to work. It sits at number 2 with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the whole of Europe, at 3.6%. Whilst some countries offer larger salaries, others offer lower average working hours per week. Plus you’re never more than a 30-minute drive away from a bustling city or the beautiful Danish countryside. Offering job security, great affordable housing, travel connectivity and safety. Industries with shortages of professionals include scientific services, engineering, healthcare, business and teaching. In 2017, France also introduced a law that allows workers the "right to disconnect" from after-hours work emails. Many companies will prefer if you are fluent in Spanish, to ease and overcome the communication barrier between you and their customers. Despite all this, we couldn’t score this lovely scenic country higher than the 5th slot and this is because of its rigorous and fierce competition. Does that mean. Please check and try again. The German government has several regulations in place to make sure its citizens don't overwork themselves. Despite not being an EU country we included Norway. On the work front, the Netherlands has lots of opportunities in finance, insurance, IT and telecommunications. However, we couldn’t give it the number one slot due to it’s slightly higher unemployment rate when compared to the others on this list, sitting at. It has even topped the UN human development index. Their lunch breaks are one to two hours long (perhaps reindeer meat takes longer to digest?). So if you love the outdoors, it’s a great place to be.